CH4

This route is located in the Muir Valley at Bruisebrothers Wall

A-Beano


12.
+4
5 votes

Rising 5.11a (Sport) ***

First Ascent: Barry Brolley, J.J. in 2004
Length: 30ft
Bolts: 3 (report bad bolts/anchors)

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Steep roof route above "CH4". Can be done in one pitch (then known as "Methane Rising"). Follow 3 more bolts to another chain anchor.
Descent: Chain Anchor
Stays Dry: Does not stay dry
Owner: Muir Valley
Steepness:
steep (1)
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Quality Consensus
 

3.29 stars (62 votes)
Grade Consensus
5.11a (54 votes)

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Submitted by: OMP
Date: Sep 23rd, 2017

Submitted by: whatahutch
Date: Mar 14th, 2010

Submitted by: jordancolburn
Date: Feb 9th, 2009

Comments

1
ray said on August 29th, 2004
Pretty cool. Looks a lot harder than it is from the ground.
2
Gaar said on February 7th, 2005
Use a 24inch runner at the first set of anchors and a 24 inch runner at the next bolt and there is no rope drag!! Steller route!! to short!
3
Sco Bro said on February 28th, 2005
That roof is a fun bucket haul. Take enough draws. If you're a dumbass you'll only take 8 because it's 3 bolts for the 5.8 and three for the 5.11, but you also need one for the 5.8 anchor. I am, in fact, a dumbass.
4
Anonymous said on March 22nd, 2005
this thing needs traffic, it's dirty and hard if you are tall and can't get your feet up over the roof.
5
Huggybone said on June 6th, 2005
Fun route, I think it deserves traffic, but does not need it.
6
travelinyouth said on July 1st, 2005
Super Fun Route! Looks sick from below and pulls out to a nice finish! Definitely use two 24 inch runners or else it is pretty tough on your rope.
7
hoss said on August 15th, 2005
The third bolt is GONE. It should be replaced soon cause you could get worked if you fell going for the chains.
8
Anonymous said on August 22nd, 2005
That bolt came out on me on the 10th. I emailed rick about it. The second bolt also needs replaced. I took a 15 footer on it, then realized it wobbled like crazy.
9
J-Rock said on August 24th, 2005
This route has been rebolted. The bolt did not fail and there was no damage to the rock, the cone, the inner sleeve, or the hole itself. Somebody needlessly endangered others by removing this bolt instead of tightening it.
10
Anonymous said on August 29th, 2005
To the know it all J-Rock, maybe you should be more conscientious about climbing in general. I was the one who attempted to tighten down the bolt. I am not a novice at this sport or the gorge sandstone. As I tightened the bolt it pulled straight out of the cap. The cap was rusted, yes rusted in half. You may have been able to thread a new bolt into the remaining cap but the anchor pulled free with very little effort. If you are the route setter I applaud your ambition for setting a short route over the roof, it was fun. But again I would suggest you pick appropriate lines for bolts. If I had fallen on that bolt it most certainly would have failed. The setter needlessly endangered others. J-Rock? This isnt JR Goodwin is it?
11
J-Rock said on August 29th, 2005
No, I did not set or bolt this route, but upon inspection of the bolt hole after the incident it was evident that there was no damage to the rock and that the cone and sleeve were still intact and not badly corroded. Therefore it is obvious that the setter did not needlessly endanger others by placing a bolt in bad rock since the rock did not fail. I don't understand what you mean by "the cap being rusted in half". The sleeve was still inside of the rock so it obviously did not pull free with very little effort (it would have been necessary to unscrew it more than an inch, especially with dynabolt golds because the rod is more fully threaded). I do know that the landowner and the person that bolted this route are both very interested in seeing the bolt itself to verify this mystery. And, I was actually being conscientious about it by reporting what had been seen and done to correct this situation. So, I don't really understand your anger or advice. Perhaps you should take the advice of Terry Kindred and tighten the loose bolt rather than removing it. And... if the bolt truly was as bad as you say then why can't you produce it for the landowner or route setter?
12
J-Rock said on August 29th, 2005
No, I did not set or bolt this route, but upon inspection of the bolt hole after the incident it was evident that there was no damage to the rock and that the cone and sleeve were still intact and not badly corroded. Therefore it is obvious that the setter did not needlessly endanger others by placing a bolt in bad rock since the rock did not fail. I don't understand what you mean by "the cap being rusted in half". The sleeve was still inside of the rock so it obviously did not pull free with very little effort (it would have been necessary to unscrew it more than an inch, especially with dynabolt golds because the rod is more fully threaded). I do know that the landowner and the person that bolted this route are both very interested in seeing the bolt itself to verify this mystery. And, I was actually being conscientious about it by reporting what had been seen and done to correct this situation. So, I don't really understand your anger or advice. Perhaps you should take the advice of Terry Kindred and tighten the loose bolt rather than removing it. And... if the bolt truly was as bad as you say then why can't you produce it for the landowner or route setter?
13
Anonymous said on August 30th, 2005
what did you look at? The sleeve was completely rusted in half. The bolt was intact but came out with half of the sleeve still on. The rusted sleeve fell into the woods when I dropped bolt, hanger and sleeve to my belay. My anger comes from your accusation of endangering others. Again, I am an experienced climber and know what I encountered. I have come across several bolts that only needed to be tightened and were fine afterwards. This one, however was not. I guide in The Red and have never endangered anyone in fifteen years of climbing. I absolutely resent the hell out of your statement. To anyone else I apologize for my tone. J-Rock, no offense but in this situation I feel your facts are incorrect.
14
J-Rock said on August 30th, 2005
Rick and J.J. thoroughly examined the hole, the rock itself, the sleeve (that was still in the hole) and the cone. None of them were damaged or heavily corroded and they were still intact. We would still like to see the bolt though (and the outer sleeve) so that we could see for ourselves what really failed because upon inspection there was nothing unusual. I WAS being conscientious about it by reporting the results of the inspection. I would expect the outer sleeve (or half of the sleeve) to come out with the bolt because there are actually two sleeves. The outer sleeve often comes out when the bolt is removed, this is not unusual either. And the outer sleeve does not wedge itself into the rock (just the inner sleeve and the cone -- which were both still intact and undamaged). Therefore, in an effort to be more conscientious, we would like to examine the bolt itself to better understand what went wrong because it appears upon inspection that everything else was fine, but we don't have the actual bolt itself. From your report it sounds like the bolt didn't break, but that the outer sleeve broke in two? We are interested in correcting any potential problems, not starting arguments.
15
t bone said on August 30th, 2005
Yea someone, Where are the bolt and hanger? What you are describing makes no sense, if you know anything about these type of bolts.The cone on this bolt was intact, meaning it someone had to unscrew it to get it out. This argument can be solved by producing the bolt in question.
16
Anonymous said on August 30th, 2005
Hey someone, to tighten a bolt you turn it clockwise. To loosen it you turn it counterclockwise. Dumbass.
17
weber said on August 30th, 2005
Everyone cool off a little. I hope this is just a matter of terminology that is causing the misunderstanding here. "Someone", please clarify what you mean by "As I tightened the bolt it pulled straight out of the cap. The cap was rusted, yes rusted in half. You may have been able to thread a new bolt into the remaining cap but the anchor pulled free with very little effort." This type of bolt screws into an internally-threaded cone, which I retrieved in almost new-like condition from the hole last week. There is no "cap" as, such, on a Dynabolt Gold. There IS an outer sleeve, which serves merely as a spacer to help position the cone and collapsable inner sleeve at the back of the hole. "Someone", I understand you found the bolt itself (i.e. the 3/8-16 threaded, headed bolt portion of the assembly) to be intact. JJ and I elected to remove the cone and inner sleeve, which we found left in the hole, and put in an entirely new bolt assembly. However, we COULD have just as well merely screwed in a new bolt (inserted through a new outer sleeve), and the mounting would be sound and secure. Keeping this fact in mind, it is puzzling to us as to why the original bolt was not able to be retreaded back into the cone -- especially since the Dynabolt Golds, when installed in a hole, require almost 1.3 inches of unthreading before they exit the threaded cone. It is almost inconceivable that climbers would allow a bolted hanger to retract that much from the wall without either reporting it or fixing it. So, I hope you can appreciate our concern about the bolt. If something unusual happened here, we sure would like to know what it was. And, without the original bolt, we can't diagnose the problem. As for future situations, we would like to ask -- no make that "plead" -- with those who find something amiss with bolted hangers in Muir to immediately report it to our attention (anyone of us associated with Muir who regularly post and monitor postings on RRC). Or, in the case of loose bolted hanger brackets, if you are capable and willing to tighten them, please do so. This Corbin sandstone is so weak in compressive strength that spinners are virtually unavoidable. That is why I have given away, at no cost, 9/16" box wrenches to anyone climbing at Muir who wishes one. If you would like a wrench, stop by the maintenance barn, and I'll give you one. Thanks to all who have contributed solid evidence in attempting to solve this mystery. However, I would ask that we work through these issues in a more appropriate arena (or part of the RRC Forum). This IS an online guide -- not a mechanical engineering debate. Perhaps a moderator can remove or relocate all the "thread-type" stuff presented here that is irrelevant to the guide. Rick Weber
18
TPearson said on August 31st, 2005
Someone, thanks alot, your input has solved the mystery. Could you be more helpful. P.s. Be part of the solution not the problem. Weber, your last bit sounds like we might be able to get somewhere now. When I pulled the bolt out I did not have to unthread it. I did however think that the spacer you spoke of was actually part of the sleeve and when I pullted the bolt out the spacer must have been what fell to my belayer then into the woods. The bolt was intact and I tried to tighten it before removing it but could not get it to thread. I sat there looking into what looked like a rusted in half sleeve thinking "don't put this back in its rusted out." We can produce the bolt and hanger still in tact. Will do so next time down. Oh, and to "someone" your Red etiquette is abit off--I live in Lou. Would love to teach you how to talk other climbers. But again thanks for your ingenious advice--boy.
19
bryanboonern said on September 3rd, 2005
This is a great roof haul. Hypersafe too.
20
Anonymous said on March 31st, 2006
Plan is to replace the second bolt with a glue in due to it being chronically loose with all of the falls it catches.
21
said on April 4th, 2006
I think it's a shame the FA felt compelled to remove this route. Sounds like it was kick-ass.
22
J-Rock said on April 4th, 2006
Yep, we tried to talk him out of it, but no luck. He even removed the access route below it.
23
Saxman said on June 28th, 2006
Someone should put it back up. Fun little route.
24
Sco Bro said on November 16th, 2006
This route kicked ass. It should be put back up.
25
Brentucky said on November 9th, 2008
that roof is good shit! glad it's back as it always looked cool, and i don't know of any other like it if you can only climb 5.11. thanks!
26
DHB said on December 31st, 2008
The second bolt (the one just above the roof) is a spinner. It took me at least five tries to get a draw in. Every time I'd go for it, I'd hit it with the nose of my biner and it'd spin away. Soooo frustrating.
27
DHB said on January 3rd, 2009
Also, there's some choss once you pull the lip, especially up around the anchors. The feet are pretty good and stout at that point, so hands aren't all that important, but be aware.
28
whatahutch said on March 30th, 2009
Did Rising in the rain. Good route still. Next time I am there, and it isn't raining it will be even better.
29
Rollo said on May 17th, 2009
not impressive.
30
rjackson said on November 26th, 2012
Fun roof moves, once you find the sweet spots. I thought the rock quality was fine. I found it a little sequential, whereas a stronger climber would probably just campus it...
31
AdamDugan said on September 8th, 2013
After climbing CH4, I took a look at the permadraws for this route and they're looking a little rusty. Heads up to anyone wanting to get on this route.
32
astathis said on August 27th, 2016
There are hornets nesting at the top of this route as of Aug 25 2016. They started buzzing as I tapped the chains, so I downclimbed and lowered off the top draw.Take care.
33
ddchil01 said on July 13th, 2017
I'm just wondering if anyone has looked at the permanent draws on this lately? They didn't look 100% to me so I actually stopped with CH4. Also should I clip my own quickdraw into the one already there or just use the permanent one? Thanks!!!
34
DrRockso said on July 16th, 2017
I replaced the two permadraws directly after the anchors on Methane about month ago with brand new climb tech permas and also inspected the rest of the permadraws and anchors and everything was in excellent condition. Could you please be more specific when you say they are 'Not 100%.' Are you asking if you should put quickdraws on the existing permadraws hanging on the protection bolts? You sincerely need to spend some time with a professional instructor if you are asking these types of questions.
35
Anonymous said on July 17th, 2017
Ddchil has posted the two most gumby comments I've read in a while back to back. I was a gumby once also, but I knew better. one day you will look back at yourself and realize how much of a gumball you were.
36
ddchil01 said on July 17th, 2017
Yes, I am still very new to outdoor climbing (and climbing in general honestly). DrRockso, the carabiner was mainly my concern on those permadraws since I did not know how long they had been there. Also Anonymous, I'm not sure what a gumby is but I'm guessing it's a newbie lol? I do appreciate the help and the advice guys!