Proposed Revised Forest Plan

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Proposed Revised Forest Plan

Post by Guest » Mon May 05, 2003 10:51 pm

The DBNF has a website for the Forest Plan Revision here: http://www.southernregion.fs.fed.us/boone/planning/
In theory you can sign up to receive a copy of the plan either in paper form or on CD but I keep getting errors. This plan was supposed to be out as early as today but it is not yet released according to the site.

Shannon was on the cover of the Courier Journal (Louisville paper) today! There was a story about the plan revision and the various interest groups involved, including but not limited (of course) to climbers.

As soon as the plan is available, I encourage everyone to submit their comments before the final copy is adopted.

Gretchen
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Post by Gretchen » Tue May 06, 2003 7:41 am

Hey Lynne, can you send me a copy of the Journal?????
Just genuinely disengenuous.

Guest

Post by Guest » Tue May 06, 2003 8:05 pm

Gretchen, the article from yesterday's Courier Journal cover story is here:
http://www.courier-journal.com/localnew ... 402805.htm
There was another photo of Shannon in the print version but I believe all the text is in this on-line article.

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ynot
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Post by ynot » Tue May 06, 2003 8:24 pm

Sounds like logging is the big issue.I'm not suprised.I have seen trees that will make 50 foot long boards,strait and tall.Drive around the gorge enough and you will see exactly what logging looks like.Sure it recovers,but it takes years for all that slash to rot and what little topsoil there is washes down the river.
"Everyone should have a plan for the zombie apocolipse" Courtney

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Post by Gretchen » Wed May 07, 2003 10:57 am

THanks Lynne!
Just genuinely disengenuous.

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Post by captain static » Wed May 07, 2003 11:18 am

I think we must be getting to Ben Worthington. He used the word crux where he was quoted in the article.
"Be responsible for your actions and sensitive to the concerns of other visitors and land managers. ... Your reward is the opportunity to climb in one of the most beautiful areas in this part of the country." John H. Bronaugh

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Post by Gretchen » Wed May 07, 2003 11:19 am

Good catch Capt.!!! That's too much. :lol: :lol:
Just genuinely disengenuous.

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Post by Guest » Wed May 07, 2003 12:12 pm

ha ha ha Capt!

Ynot, I was concerned when I read the article. In fact that reminds me, there were charts in the printed version and an inset blurb showing the drastic reduction of logging over the last decade and the slant of the article almost seemed to be a preparation for a massive return to logging. I went on the DBNF site and their latest report indicates 89% of the Red is harvestable. Scary stuff. 89%!

As soon as the report is out, whoever sees it first, please post here so we can all get copies and scour the proposed plans. We all need to give feedback, perhaps everyone can try to attend the next RRGCC meeting so we can make sure not to miss any important factors related to climbing access.

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Post by Wes » Wed May 07, 2003 12:43 pm

Nothing wrong with logging, as long as it is done right. Hell, 90%+ of the red has already been logged at least once, someparts 2-3 times. What do you think you are following to get to the crag? Old logging roads...

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Post by Guest » Wed May 07, 2003 1:01 pm

Wes wrote:Nothing wrong with logging, as long as it is done right. Hell, 90%+ of the red has already been logged at least once, someparts 2-3 times. What do you think you are following to get to the crag? Old logging roads...

Wes
Wes, it's the "as long as it is done right" qualifier that concerns me.

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Post by Gretchen » Wed May 07, 2003 1:59 pm

I FEEL that Ben Worthington is a tremendous leader and very beneficial to the DBNF. Let's not lose sight to the reality that the land was set aside specifically for logging.
Just genuinely disengenuous.

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Post by Wes » Wed May 07, 2003 3:27 pm

Lynne, true, but they have some pretty hard core guidelines that need to be followed these days. Much better then the clear cutting of the past.

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Post by ynot » Wed May 07, 2003 7:01 pm

There is no way to do it right. Lots of critters will loose thier homes regardless of how its done.

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Post by Guest » Thu May 08, 2003 8:29 am

Okay, it's going to be ready shortly - I just checked the site

Proposed Revised Land and Resource Management Plan and
Draft Environmental Impact Statement
(Available after 10 am May 8, 2003)


News Release (NOTE MEETING SCHEDULE BELOW):
Winchester – May 8, 2003

For Immediate Release

The framework for future management direction for the Daniel Boone National Forest was announced by Forest Supervisor Ben Worthington as he made the Proposed Revised Forest Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement available for public review today.

The Forest Plan provides the overall guidance that is usedfor each project that occurs on a national forest. National Forests are managed to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation’s forests to meet the needs of present and future generations. The 700,000-acre Daniel Boone National Forest stretches across Eastern Kentucky.

The current Forest Plan was signed in 1985. In 1996, the Forest Service notified the public of the need to revise the 1985 Plan in response to changes in agency policy and recreation use patterns. New scientific information and forest health threats also provided reasons to revise the 1985 Plan.

“Throughout the revision process we have continually asked the public what they wanted the Daniel Boone to be for present and future generations,” stated Worthington. “We feel the scientific analysis contained in these draft documents recommends the alternative that would provide the best mix of conditions and uses to meet the diverse needs of people while protecting the resources.”

Forest Service personnel analyzed six alternatives and documented the analysis in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement. A preferred alternative was chosen and the Proposed Revised Forest Plan wasdeveloped. “We chose Alternative C-1 as the preferred alternative because it emphasizes the maintenance and restoration of ecological processes and functions while also emphasizing recreation opportunities,” said Worthington.

Alternative C-1:

Provides a greater emphasis on desired conditions - or outcomes - from the Forest, focusing on what is left behind not what is taken out.
Utilizes the best available science to reduce the risk of wildfire, insect infestation, plant diseases, and other forest health concerns.
Provides a wide array of recreational opportunities with special emphasis on enhancing dispersed recreation management such as trail use.
Restores and protects habitats for 4,000 plant and animals with special emphasis on rare species.
Provides a different role for timber harvesting. Trees would be cut to manage for habitat diversity and to restore ecosystem health; however, the estimated level of harvest would be lower than the 1985 Plan.
Allows for an increased role of prescribed fire to manage for habitat diversity and to restore ecosystem health.
Protects Wilderness and other special areas that provide wild and natural features of the forests.
Provides riparian areas and domestic water sources with special management emphasis.
“The preferred alternative would provide the framework to reduceforest health threats resulting from ice and snow storms, southern pine beetle attacks and future threats from gypsy moth,” said Worthington.

Now the public has an opportunity to provide comments onthese proposals. The public comment period will run 90 days from the date the release is published in the Federal Register, which is anticipated to be May 16, 2003. The Forest Service will hold nine open house sessions at the following locations to answer questions about the proposed planning documents.

Meeting locations and dates are as follows:
May 19 Natural Bridge State Resort Park, Slade, 4-7 pm
May 20 Leslie County Cooperative Extension Office, Hyden, 4-7 pm
May 22 London Community Center, London, 4-7 pm
May 28 Hurstbourne Hotel, Louisville, 2-4 pm and 6-8 pm
May 29 Carl Perkins Center, Morehead, 4-7 pm
May 31 Carl Perkins Building, EKU, Richmond, 12-3 pm
June 2 Boone County Cooperative Extension Office, Burlington, 4-7 pm
June 3 Somerset Community College McCreary County Center, Whitley City, 4-7 pm
June 4 Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office, Lexington, 2-4 pm and 6-8 pm

“We are not locked into the preferred alternative; however,we see Alternative C-1 as providing the best balance between the variety of public uses and protecting the Forest resources,” added Worthington. “We are looking for substantive comments that will help us make the final decision on how to manage the Daniel Boone National Forest for present and future generations.”

A special Forest Service team will analyze all comments. Comments should be postmarked or received by the Forest Service no later than the last day of the comment period. Comments should be sent to:

Daniel Boone National Forest
Content Analysis Team
P.O. Box 221150
Salt Lake City, UT 84122
Fax: 801-517-1015
E-Mail: [email protected]

For more information on the public meetings or to access the draft planning documents electronically visit the Daniel Boone National Forest web site at: http://www.southernregion.fs.fed.us/boone/planning or contact the Forest Supervisor’s Office at 859-745-3100 for paper copies or a compact disc.

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Post by Guest » Thu May 08, 2003 8:35 am

I will be at the Louisville meeting on May 28 - the 6-8 pm meeting. If any other Louisvillians would like to hook up, let me know and let's make plans.

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