gentle reminder

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anticlmber
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gentle reminder

Post by anticlmber » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:18 pm

climbing is dangerous, period.

1) please keep a hand on the brake end at ALL TIMES, gri-gri, cinch, atc, whatever, hold on to it please.
2) ALWAYS double check each other BEFORE leaving the ground.
3) know what the climber plans on doing once at the anchors, before leaving the ground.
4) please don't teach" how to clean when someone is at the anchor
5) if you see something unsafe, say something.
6) look out for others and maybe they will look out for you, remember, we are all stewards of our sport/area and we owe it to others to pass on the kind, caring, and responsible community vibe that we have.

be safe
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Eric Cox

Post by Eric Cox » Sat Apr 24, 2010 3:12 pm

I couldn't agree with you more anti.
I'll never forget the time at Roadside when I couldn't get the rope to feed through my gri-gri as my partner was clipping. Much to my suprize, I had loaded it backwards. My partner (a.s.s.u.m.e.d.) I had done things correctly. Of course, I never took my hand off of the brake strand, and when they went direct to the anchors, I quickly fixed my mistake and was able to lowered them to the ground safe and sound.
A ten second double check would have avoided this.
I'll be the first to admit that I am not above making a mistake.
Always double check yourself.

the lurkist
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Post by the lurkist » Sat Apr 24, 2010 3:43 pm

There needs to be a renaissance of climbing safety. Back to the basics-
- always check each other- a few seconds of climber and belayer tuning out everything else at the crag to look at each other, check knot, harnesses, rope, belay.
- this time allows the belayer to focus on the task at hand
- for the belayer to tune out other extraneous distractions and be focused on the climber
- perhaps for the belayer to not talk while belaying is not too high a standard

simple stuff, but has to be done every single time.

I wish Terry were here.
"It really is all good ! My thinking only occasionally calls it differently..."
Normie

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caribe
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Post by caribe » Sat Apr 24, 2010 8:10 pm

I like this thread. Certainly no beer, pot or heroin while on belay or climbing either. Just save your vices for later. If you want to do drugs they can wait.

anticlmber
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Post by anticlmber » Sat Apr 24, 2010 8:17 pm

the drugs keep me sane art and honestly.....i'm losing my mind.


and climbing is my vice
Like me on facebook but hate me in real life

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gravitycoach
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Post by gravitycoach » Sat Apr 24, 2010 9:01 pm

anticlmber wrote:the drugs keep me sane art and honestly.....i'm losing my mind.


and climbing is my vice
Amen!!!

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Jeff
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Post by Jeff » Sat Apr 24, 2010 10:02 pm

the lurkist wrote:I wish Terry were here.
me too. That nose crinkling smile would be cool to see about now.

robert birchell
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belay

Post by robert birchell » Sat Apr 24, 2010 11:45 pm

7. Belayer should wear gloves.

The leader can can check that the belayer has a gri gri
loaded right by a quick tug on the rope. It will have tension
if loaded in proper manner. Same as a fall.

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kato
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Re: belay

Post by kato » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:41 am

robert birchell wrote:7. Belayer should wear gloves.
Not crazy about seeing belayers wearing gloves. If your technique is good, you have no danger of ropeburn. Having protection against ropeburn lets belayers get sloppy.
No chalkbag since 1995.

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michaelarmand
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Post by michaelarmand » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:14 am

I love innovation, but I think belaying has become more complicated with all the new belay devices on the market. When first started climbing I used a old school eight. Then I got an ATC, it was just awesome. Then I got a JAWS ATC and that was even better. I also got an ATC guide, which I then lost in the snow, but loved the guide feature. I now usually use a Gri-Gri, which I feel very comfortable with. The other day I used a cinch and hated it. I am not trying to debate this or any other device but over the years my brain and hands learned how to belay a certain way, and this device didn't work for me.

I think we would all be safer if we only used one device (and used it well).
I've been a gumby longer than you've been climbing.

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steep4me
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Post by steep4me » Sun Apr 25, 2010 11:53 am

michaelarmand wrote:I love innovation, but I think belaying has become more complicated with all the new belay devices on the market.
I think we would all be safer if we only used one device (and used it well).
I was just thinking the same thing. I feel very comfortable with the gri gri, so why change devices? It just adds room for error. My brain has been wired for the gri gri over the past 12 or 23 years.

Nobody has mentioned it, but I feel terrible for the belayers involved w/ a climbing accident. No matter what the cause of the accident, the belayer often feels responsible. Anyone can make a mistake, and many of us have made mistakes, but luckily came out ok. I hope some people check in and offer support to whomever was belaying Mike the other day. That's a tough position to be in.
Hauling a big ego up a route adds at least a full grade.

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caribe
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Post by caribe » Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:50 pm

Used properly any market device will work well. Mentally map your dominant hand to the brake-end of the rope and always track this end with your hand. In the event of incident your body position has to default to brake-position (hand on brake). All device manuals have this general recipe as the undercurrent in the instructions. Their research has shown them that this is way to do it. If the population strays from this, the frequency of accidents will increase.

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caribe
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Post by caribe » Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:51 pm

I really feel for the belayer in the recent accident. What an awful experience.

the lurkist
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Post by the lurkist » Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:25 pm

[quote="steep4me"] I hope some people check in and offer support to whomever was belaying Mike the other day. quote]

Amen. He needs support.
"It really is all good ! My thinking only occasionally calls it differently..."
Normie

lena_chita
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Re: gentle reminder

Post by lena_chita » Sun Apr 25, 2010 1:36 pm

anticlmber wrote:climbing is dangerous, period.

1) please keep a hand on the brake end at ALL TIMES, gri-gri, cinch, atc, whatever, hold on to it please.
2) ALWAYS double check each other BEFORE leaving the ground.
3) know what the climber plans on doing once at the anchors, before leaving the ground.
4) please don't teach" how to clean when someone is at the anchor
5) if you see something unsafe, say something.
6) look out for others and maybe they will look out for you, remember, we are all stewards of our sport/area and we owe it to others to pass on the kind, caring, and responsible community vibe that we have.

be safe
Agree, of course. But while the first 4 are no-brainer,s things get a bit less clear on #5 and 6.

I can honestly say that I have seen more people with brake hands off the rope (using gri-gris) at the 'lode than at any "beginner-friendly" crag. If the guys are climbing .13s, and have taken and caught hundreds of falls, are they going to listen to me telling them to keep the hand on the rope at all times? Nope. The most I have said in this scenario is something along the lines of "wow, it makes me really nervous when I see people doing that". The other person would smile back and say something like "oh, it's O.K., I got it under control"

So while I agree that we should look out for each other, saying something really only works if the person saying it has some weight with the people that are doing something unsafe.

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