Louisville Kind of Deep Water Soloing

Other Crags, Aid Climbing, Bouldering, etc...
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pigsteak
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Post by pigsteak » Sat Aug 01, 2009 9:30 pm

sadly steve..not.
Positive vibes brah...positive vibes.

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Post by KD » Sat Aug 01, 2009 10:41 pm

yes I am a troll under a bridge who wants his super-secret louisville deep water soloing spot with three feet of water left alone goddammit!

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Post by Redpoint » Mon Aug 03, 2009 3:10 pm

Hey it has some potential, all it takes is a harder rain for the creek's level to be higher, and I haven't even checked out the other side, it might be deep over there. With all of the pinchers it got me pumped in just a short amount of time, and so I know it's a good workout.
"It is difficult to estimate the potential damage of solvents; therefore the middle of the rope should never be marked with a felt-tip pen or similar. Although a danger might be improbable, it should never be ignored." Mammut

endercore
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Post by endercore » Tue Aug 04, 2009 1:55 pm

this enough rain for you redpoint?

i bet you can "kinda" dws all over louisville now.

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Post by Redpoint » Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:40 pm

UPDATE:

I found a new deep water solo spot at this limestone quarry, and it's plenty deep. It's so close to Louisville if I drove you there a certain way you would think you were still in Louisville. It was an amazing feeling climbing routes that might have never had a person on them before. The routes were fun with thought provoking moves, and good movement once you realize what to do, and I would rate them both as 5.9's. The first one reminded me of the gorge, the start was the hardest part(thanks to super slippery moss below the waterline). There is one time when you are pulling a bulge that if you look down it looks like you could hit the slab below you, but in reality it's not likely to actually happen since the bulge sticks out just as far as the base of the cliff. This route contains my new favorite handhold, it's this thin limestone flake that just protrudes out of a flat blank wall. You can actually get your fingers behind it, and so I thought it would be referred to as a plate. I thought maybe it could get ripped off easily, and so I did a pull test and it was solid.

The other route was pretty scary, there is this ledge that protrudes out that is almost even with the water level. Later on during the climb when you traverse above it, if you look down it gets scary. I just kept reminding myself to push off hard if I fall. I was pretty much in my solo(or cave climbing) state of mind, and I knew there was no room for error, especially a feet slipping and then your hands going and you fall strait down on the ledge kind of error. Finally I saw a wasp flying around and he seemed pissed at me so I bailed out. After further inspection I noticed a bunch starting to swarm around the area where I last saw the wasp, and so I think they have a nest there.

I almost forgot how great climbing on limestone can be, sometimes the texture feels like the grippy handholds of Cherokee Park, and other times there is smooth slopers. There is: pinches, amazingly smooth crimpers that have v shaped slit cut outs, crimpers that are just really textured, sidepulls, massive jugs, pockets with too much grip, and some that feel fine on your fingertips. O ya and there was another short 5.7, and one ledgerline, it was like stairs with ledges just below you every step you take.

Tomorrow I am organizing a big trash cleanup there, it's a mess. The only thing I don't know is if this place is 100% legal, but from what I have heard it might be ok. I am going to do further research on it, and if the place is legal I will definitely release it's location, but I might never tell KD where it is, not that he cares anyhow since he has his own little gym :wink:
"It is difficult to estimate the potential damage of solvents; therefore the middle of the rope should never be marked with a felt-tip pen or similar. Although a danger might be improbable, it should never be ignored." Mammut

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Post by KD » Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:05 pm

dude, that's the preston street quarry by 265 everybody has been climbing there for years. john long showed it to me back in the early 80s

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Post by jordancolburn » Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:32 pm

The holds at cherokee are grippy? Out of the few times i've been bored enough to climb there, i wouldn't exactly describe it as.....grippy.........

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Post by KD » Sat Aug 08, 2009 11:55 pm

when i used to go to cherokee park it was hippy but not grippy

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Post by powen01 » Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:34 am

That's my property. Stay off of it if you know what's good for you. I plan on sending all the grippy projects then I may possibly allow others to climb there. Most likely just KD, so don't get your panties wet in anticipation.

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Post by KD » Sun Aug 09, 2009 12:11 pm

thanks powen01 btw i finished the stock on you shotgun and you can pick it up at any time

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Post by powen01 » Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:34 pm

Cool. I chromed that TP dispenser just like you asked too. We can meet at our super secret bartering location later to settle up.

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Post by Redpoint » Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:41 pm

The climb next to Big Rock in Cherokee park has great handholds, I wonder if rain is how all those tiny pockets form in the handholds, they are almost too grippy.

KD, that is not the quarry I'm talking about, it's not in Louisville.


UPDATE - bad news -

Well it started off as a great day, cliff jumping off of 25, 50, and 75 foot cliffs, kayaking, snorkeling, swimming, and climbing. We picked up plenty of trash and at least the hang out spot looked real nice when we got finished. We saw a local girl and she told us about how cars are always getting towed where we parked, and that the cops might see the cars and come back to the quarry to fine us for trespassing.

We moved our cars to a more clever spot, and then went back to our shenanigans. I asked her if she has ever seen anyone climb my new favorite route, and she said yes.

Later we talked to another local who said the owner lets people dirtbike and hike with his permission, but nobody is allowed to swim there. He said he has been swimming there since he was a kid, and has been busted by the cops 5 times. They always just drove him back to his house though, but I figured he was just so lucky because he was a local.

He told me that they used to walk along this trail to go and cliff jump, but he said he recently discovered that the face under the jump spot was climbable(my route, or I thought it was my route).

Some of my friends left, and came right back to tell everyone all 4 of our cars had been towed. The lady at the sheriffs department said they tow cars because people go back there to swim. She also mentioned that the sheriff might put a block on getting our cars un-towed because we had to speak to the him first since he might want to give us all trespassing fines. Our friend on the phone denied everything, and just claimed we were hanging out at a friends house. Luckily the sheriff was busy, and we got one car un-towed for $110 without having to speak to the sheriff somehow.

so basically this spot is all bad, but I might still go back one day, and next time park my car far as crap at some gas station.
Last edited by Redpoint on Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"It is difficult to estimate the potential damage of solvents; therefore the middle of the rope should never be marked with a felt-tip pen or similar. Although a danger might be improbable, it should never be ignored." Mammut

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Post by tactless » Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:01 pm

Redpoint, after reading your most recent post, i think that your upgrade from "gumby" is very apropos. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Post by KD » Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:05 pm

Wow he got a avatar with less than 200 posts! nice redpoint! john long would be proud!

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Post by Redpoint » Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:24 pm

If it was decided by the amount of words you type I would have gotten it on my first. John Long: (born 1953) is an American rock climber and author. A graduate of Upland High School in 1971, a one-time divinity student at Claremont School of Theology and former weightlifter, Long was a founding member of an elite group of Idyllwild climbers in the 1970s known as the "Stonemasters". Others in this group included John Bachar, Rick Accomazzo, Richard Harrison, Tobin Sorenson, Rob Muir, Gib Lewis, Jim Wilson, Mike Graham.

Long's many climbing feats include the first one-day ascent of the 3,000 foot Nose route on El Capitan. He was also a boulderer and free-climber of some note. In 1974 he led the Paisano Overhang (5.12c) on Suicide Rock in Southern California. And in 1978 he climbed Hangover, a 5.12c route at nearby Tahquitz Rock. Also, in 1976, he made the first free ascent (5.11) of the Chouinard-Herbert route on Sentinel Rock in Yosemite National Park. As an adventurer, he participated in a coast-to-coast traverse of Borneo.

A prolific author, Long's best known books are the "How to Climb" series.

Books

* Long, John (1988). Gorilla Monsoon. Falcon Press Publishing Company. ISBN 9780934641036.
* Long, John (1993). How to Rock Climb: Climbing Anchors. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long, John (1994). Rock Jocks Wall Rats and Hang Dogs: Rock Climbing on the Edge of Reality. Fireside Book published by Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-88466-2.
* Long, John (2006). How to Rock Climb: Climbing Anchors. Falcon Press. ISBN 978-0762723263.
* Long, John (2006). How to Rock Climb: Basic Climbing Anchors. Falcon. ISBN 978-0762724697.

* Long, John; Craig Luebben (1997). How to Rock Climb Series: Advanced Rock Climbing. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long & Middendorf, John & John (1994). How to Rock Climb: Big Walls. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-63-3.
* Long, John (1997). How to Rock Climb: Big Walls. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long, John (1995). How to Rock Climb: Gym Climb. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long, John (2000). How to Rock Climb: How to Rock Climb! (Third Edition ed.). Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long, John; Bob Gaines (1996). How to Rock Climb: More Climbing Anchors. Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.
* Long, John (1997). How to Rock Climb: Sport Climbing (Third Edition ed.). Chockstone Press, Evergreen, Colorado. ISBN 0-934641-37-4.

* Long, John (2000). Long on Adventure: The Best of John Long. Falcon Press. ISBN 978-1560449850.
* Long, John (1999). Close Calls. Falcon Press. ISBN 978-1560447627.
* Long, John (1999). The High Lonesome: Epic Solo Climbing Stories. Falcon Press. ISBN 978-1560448587.

Videos

* John Long, Ron Kauk, Mari Gingery, Russ Walling, Kevin Powell, Darrell Hensel. (1990’s). The Art Of Leading Describes strategies for safe and successful multi-pitch rock climbing. [commercial venture].
"It is difficult to estimate the potential damage of solvents; therefore the middle of the rope should never be marked with a felt-tip pen or similar. Although a danger might be improbable, it should never be ignored." Mammut

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