The most technique-intensive route you've climbed at the RRG

Gaston? High Step? Drop Knee? Talk in here.
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jenbongo
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Post by jenbongo » Mon Jun 28, 2010 3:52 pm

Momma Cindy .11something with heel-hooking and mantling
Jungle Trundler .11a with undercling-balance move
Happy Trails .10b - bulgy, so you can't see what you're going for
Slick and the 9mm .10b sport + 5.9 trad (2 pitches) for variety
Snake 5.8 trad - slither, then hand jam

allen
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Post by allen » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:21 pm

Science Friction, Wicked Games, Samurai, Castle has Fallen, Snotrocket
Then again there's the fact that African swallows are non migratory...

Jay
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Post by Jay » Wed Jul 21, 2010 2:15 pm

Some that immediately come to mind-

Yellow Brick Road
Curbside No Traction
Kentucky Flu
The Beeneling
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Jay
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Post by Jay » Wed Jul 21, 2010 2:27 pm

caribe wrote:Please read through this and stay with me even though you don't initially understand what I am talking about. The concept is straight forward.

When we talk about transitions at a molecular level we consider
A ─► [A*] ─► B
where A, A*, and B are a collection of states (parametric descriptors) that the molecule can be in at a certain energy and where A and B are at relatively low energy compared to A*.

Molecular changes that occur less readily have only a few allowed states for A*. Likewise molecular changes that occur readily have comparatively more allowed states for A*.

:shock: If you made it this far thanks for reading!

A move on a climb involves a body change from a relatively relaxed position (A) through an uncomfortable position (A*) to a new relatively relaxed position (B). The more body positions (configurations, parametric descriptors that specify your position, fitness, mental state, etc) that you can possibly take on through the move (as A*) the less technical the less ß-intensive the move.

I think the technical level of a climb can be defined mathematically given one's body parameters and the routes exact specifications. . . but that would take a lot of work. I think it is fine that we listen to one another describe our experientia and cite the grade of the climb. I am fine with that. :| All moves (and the sum of a set of moves= a route, hence all routes) strictly speaking can not have the same technical level, or you are going to have to redefine technique.
Art, you really need to make this whole paragraph your signature line... :wink:
"Always carry a large flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake." -W.C. Fields

lilyran
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re

Post by lilyran » Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:01 am

Yes, If you put two collections of climbers side by side they would not come to thermal equilibrium. People are not sub-nano-sized particles that dissipate their kinetic energy off each other. Buffy The Vampire Slayer controls the game. If you don't have the cash you won't do anything I'm afraid.
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Re: The most technique-intensive route you've climbed at the

Post by merrick » Wed Sep 01, 2010 6:39 pm

Prime Directive certainly had one of the more technical sections I have climbed in the red.
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