Looking for a GriGri

Selling some gear? Find or lose something?
Meadows
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Post by Meadows » Tue May 24, 2005 9:24 am

So I was climbing with this awesome chic last week who decked last year when she got lowered from a gri gri (new person on belay). The fall resulted in a broken arm. She thought of a cool analogy that might help you all in teaching the use of a gri gri: when opening the cam to lower, think of it as a light dimmer. Some think of it as a light switch that you flip on/off.

KD
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Post by KD » Tue May 24, 2005 9:29 am

i like the 'ol gas-and-brakes analogy

Sunshine
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Post by Sunshine » Tue May 24, 2005 9:34 am

marathonmedic wrote:
ynot wrote:You coming this weekend Eathan? I can sell you mine.It never gets used.
Damnit. I wish I would have known. There isn't a place anywhere down there to buy a Gri-Gri. I tried. Miguel's, nope. Matt's, nope. Marks, nope. I really wanted to buy one.
You can buy a Gri-Gri at Torrent gear shop which is at Cfiff View.
So now you'd better stop and rebuild all your ruins,
For peace and trust can win the day despite of all your losing-- Zep

quicksilver
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gri-gri accidents

Post by quicksilver » Thu May 26, 2005 12:00 am

Alan Evil,
Here is the scenario that has happened at our gym and at least two others. The climber is being lowered and for whatever reason decides to grab a hold and/or reestablish his or her self on the wall. the belay is now unweighted but the inexperienced belayer is still holding the gri-gri handle open. Climber lets go & catches the belayer by surprise. Belayer instintively pulls back on the handle, loses control with the break hand and the climber decks. Typically the climber is much heavier than the belayer. In our case a Father and his 13 yr. old son. We teach a two handed belay and lowering technique. Both hands on the rope at all times.
Does not translate as well as the more traditional pinch and slide method if and when the person wants to move to lead belaying but is a safer method of top rope belaying. We only use ATCs. Experienced climbers can use a gri-gri if they demonstrate proper knowledge. As for the reference to a tendency for experienced climbers not to be helpful to new
climbers. I have personally introduced too many people to count to the joy of climbing. Josh and I work very hard at making everyone feel welcome in the climbing community as this is one of the great aspects of climbing. All things being equal I would prefer a gri-gri belay and a rap off if the belayer is unsure of what they are doing. Having decked from 40 feet I perhaps am a little paranoid. Having been in the gym business for over 7 years I can attest to what crazy things people do on belay. Just last week I was at the gym climbing with a friend on the night we are closed to the public. A young couple came in not knowing we were closed on Monday and since they had waivers on file I let them climb since they were there. My partner recognized the young man as a new gym volunteer. He immediately started up the lead wall. His girl friend was using an ATC but would take he brake hand off and hold the body of the ATC as you would a gri-gri when she fed out rope. The climber was totally unaware of this so I grab the rope as a back up, had the climber lower off
and explained the situation. What's up with that ?? One time Josh looked up at a young climber who had decided to sit on our rappel deck (24feet).
Josh noticed that his fig. 8 knot was tied to a gear loop instead of his belay loop. Josh soloed up the wall and tied him in correctly. You have to watch all the time. It stands to reason that with all the climbers outdoors now that some of this stuff goes on there too. On occasion I have spoken up outside to strangers about a dangerous technique and get the dreaded kiss my ass look. Overall most people are happy if you help them but even in the gym some people take offense. Why is anyones guess. We always tell people during the belay lesson that they need to seek further instruction before moving outdoors. Gotta go. Thinking about this makes me want to sell my gym - Interested? Just kidding . Have a great Memorial Day Weekend.
"If you smile at me I will understand
Because that is something everybody, everywhere does in the same language"
Crosby,Stills and Nash - Wooden Ships

J-Rock
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Re: gri-gri accidents

Post by J-Rock » Thu May 26, 2005 12:38 am

quicksilver wrote:Alan Evil,
All things being equal I would prefer a gri-gri belay and a rap off if the belayer is unsure of what they are doing.
Me too!
"Those iron spikes you use have shortened the life expectancy of the Totem Pole by 50,000 years."

--A Navaho elder

andy_lemon
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Post by andy_lemon » Thu May 26, 2005 3:25 am

Belayer instintively pulls back on the handle, loses control with the break hand and the climber decks.
If the ropes are rapped twice at the top (anchor) there will be additionally friction on the system and can help add security to the gumby factor.
Not a bitch.

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ynot
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Post by ynot » Thu May 26, 2005 7:23 pm

How is that going to stop you when the gumby drops you?
"Everyone should have a plan for the zombie apocolipse" Courtney

KD
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Post by KD » Fri May 27, 2005 11:32 am

my guess on the frequency of gri gri indoor accidents is affected by the frequency of the use.

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