MV anchor cleaning accident

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Josephine
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MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Josephine » Thu Jun 30, 2011 2:02 am

From Rick's Facebook page:
We want to send out a huge THANK YOU to the Muir Valley Rescue group, and volunteer climbers, who helped to save a young man's life last Saturday at the Bruise Brothers Wall. Once again, the Muir Valley emergency system worked beautifully, providing for a very fast response and patient evacuation. Mark Ryan, a WFR headed up the patient stabilization and treatment. This is the fourth serious incident this year, and because the Wolfe County Emergency Services do not “leave the tarmac” to attend to injured persons in wilderness settings, the Muir Valley Rescue group has become an absolute necessity. - Rick and Liz
The young man who fell 75 feet from the top of a climb in Muir is still in critical condition, but doctors are optimistic. His survival is nothing short of a miracle. It really helped that he was still in his "golden hour" when the helicopter landed at UK Trauma Center.

If you know Chao, you can friend him on facebook through Logan Brown for updates on his condition. Hopefully he will have a speedy recovery. So glad that the emergency system was in place to help him get quick care.
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Noell
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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Noell » Thu Jun 30, 2011 9:47 am

So is someone able to explain how the accident occured? Cleaning accident? What went wrong?
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ynp1
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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by ynp1 » Thu Jun 30, 2011 10:55 am

I want to know how BB wall got to be 75 feet tall? I can see how a climber can fall off a cliff... Gravity happens.
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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by EricDorsey » Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:45 am

The right side of the wall seems close to 75 feet, rat stew has to be pretty close.... but anyway I would be interested in finding out what happened as well.

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Monty » Thu Jun 30, 2011 12:25 pm

I would like to thank the MV Rescue Group for all the hard work they have done and the effort they put in to making Muir a safer place to climb.

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Spoonman » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:35 pm

hope he is all right!!.....to who ever helped thank you!

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Frethawk » Wed Oct 16, 2013 3:38 pm

1
Last edited by Frethawk on Wed Oct 16, 2013 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by weber » Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:19 pm

We believe that it is inappropriate to post speculation regarding climbing accidents at Muir on this forum. When all the facts are determined, the causes will be reported on the Muir Valley Facebook page and in the AAC publication: "Accidents in North American Mountaineering." In all cases, patient privacy will be respected as per HIPAA.

However, because some of the details have now been posted, this followup will help clarify.

Definitive cause of the October 6, 2013 accident: Climber did not have both ends of his rope on the ground when he rappelled after cleaning the anchors. He had not tied a stopper knot in the end of the short rope. His belay/rappel device was rigged correctly, the rope was through both anchor rings, and his rappel was backed up with an autoblock loop. After cleaning the last draw under the anchors, he rapped off the short end of the rope, fell approximately 56 feet, and impacted the ground. Two Muir Valley Rescue volunteers were nearby and immediately declared a medical emergency on the MVR emergency radio channel. Karsten DeLap, an MVR volunteer and wilderness paramedic, arrived on scene within four minutes. A helicopter was also called in. The patient was assessed, stabilized, packaged for litter transport, and carried out by Muir Valley Rescue personnel. The helicopter took the patient to Huntington W.V. as the weather window was closed to Lexington. - Rick Weber
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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Frethawk » Wed Oct 16, 2013 9:01 pm

I was there and just wanted to know what happened, the events play over and over in my head. I'm not much of a climber, and I didn't know there was a hush-hush regarding accidents, especially in instances that turn out relatively positive such as this. My apologies if I offended anyone.

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by krampus » Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:34 am

Can we at least have a discussion on how we can make climbing safer for everyone and reduce the individual responsibility for ones own self? It's been at least three months since the last convo like this
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clif
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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by clif » Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:05 pm

NO texting while on belay. and
DO NOT TWERK directly through the anchors.
training is for people who care, i have a job.

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by lena_chita » Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:39 pm

krampus wrote:Can we at least have a discussion on how we can make climbing safer for everyone and reduce the individual responsibility for ones own self? It's been at least three months since the last convo like this

Reducing individual responsibility is pretty easy. My daughter has mastered it. (Holding a printout that describes in detail what she needed to do for now-late-or-missing assignment) but MOM, you didn't tell me that I had to actually DO IT!

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by lena_chita » Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:40 pm

And now in all seriousness, wishing everyone involved a speedy recovery.

it is pretty sad that the accidents are now occurring with such regularitiy, and are similar-enough that I thought josephine was posting about one of the recent accidents, and only later realized that this was an old thread that got resurrected

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Crankmas » Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:53 pm

My thanks as well to all involved in all rescues, is there a part of MVP that is designated for helicopter assisted transport? Might be something to consider in the other areas, heady stuff, climb safe and watch / check your buddy as he/ she does the same

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Re: MV anchor cleaning accident

Post by Shannon » Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:11 pm

Frethawk, I don’t think your interest in what happened and request to discuss is unreasonable at all. Sorry if it may have come across as a hush-hush topic or that you may have offended. Especially, since you say the events play over and over in your head…that must have been hard to be that close to the accident and not have some closure. No doubt others could/would benefit from a discussion regarding accidents of this type (or any type), i.e., things to do different, look out for, etc. I, for one, am sympathetic to your interest especially since you also say you are not much of a climber, suggesting you are relatively new or less experienced and perhaps interested in learning.

I think Rick was correctly suggesting that accident victims’ privacy need to be respected and speculation in the absence of fact to be avoided so as to not unfairly, however innocent or well-intended, malign anyone.

However, I don’t think this forum or any forum is out of bound for a sobering, thoughtful discussion about any and all climbing accidents, if done without, intentionally or unintentionally, indicting or criticizing anyone.

As Rick has stated (if I understand correctly), this particular accident was the direct result of the climber rappelling off the short end of their rope while descending from the anchors of a sport route, removing draws (cleaning) as they descended. The short end obviously was not on the ground and there was no stopper knot in the end of the rope or a knot tied bringing both ends together. The climber had cleaned, the draws off the anchors and the last bolt under the anchors, then rapped off one end of their rope and fell the remaining distance.

There was, what I thought a good discussion on facebook by some experienced climbers who I respect, including Rick, about this accident (not the particular person but some of the facts of the accident) and there was a lot of good comments and points raised. While I read the comments I thought about your request.

I will not attempt to answer any, only highlight some of the issues raised…
1. What, if any is/are the climbing partner(s)/belayer’s duty/involvement to assist the rappelling climber? Eyes on the ground? None?
2. What should/can experienced climbers offer less experienced climbers in their vicinity? Keep an eye out for them?
3. Should lowering be encouraged as opposed to rappelling off routes?
4. Does knowing there are competent rescue crews available in the area reduce the “sense” of risk in a climber’s minds?

I do not have answers for these questions or presume to say what others should do. I have my preferences, for example, I prefer to be lowered as opposed to rappel. I admit I make mistakes. I know that I take risks, sometimes unnecessary. I personally subscribe to what I call the John Bronaugh rule (from whom I borrowed the following)…100% personal responsibility for all of my climbing decisions, actions and risks, rely on no one for anything, be able to extricate myself in all situations as if I climbed alone. And yet, I try to keep an eye out for ALL other climbers in my vicinity, offering “fireman catches” or telling them if their rope is on the ground to climbers rappelling, watch others thread their gri gri, etc. In other words, expect nothing (from others), offer everything. :D

Ok, I will shut up and get out of the way and hope others will jump in and add their thoughts.

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